5 Types of Glass Cabinet Doors

5 Types of Glass Cabinet Doors

If you're looking to install glass cabinets, you'll need to consider what type of glass cabinet doors you want.

Everyone has a piece worthy of display. Whether it's a treasured family heirloom, a hard-won prize, or a rare collector's item, you have an object that you're proud of.

With a beautiful glass front cabinet, you can put your treasure on a pedestal for the world to see.

When picking out a display case, there's one major consideration you'll have to make: what kind of glass cabinet doors are right for your cabinet?

There are several styles of cabinet doors you might choose from. Each has a unique look, offering a different feel and tone for your décor.

Keep reading to learn about five styles of glass door for your cabinets.

1. Clear Glass Cabinets

Most display cabinets feature clear glass. The reason why is obvious: a glass front cabinet is usually meant to show off the objects inside. Clear glass makes it easy to see what the cabinet holds.

Many display cabinets don't just have glass doors--they're made entirely out of glass, so the display pieces can be seen from any angle.

Clear glass is an attractive option because it looks sleek and elegant. Want to show off how clean and organized your home is? There's no better way to do it than an impeccably arranged display cabinet with spotless glass doors.

The downside of clear glass is that it requires a bit more maintenance than other glass types. Smudges, fingerprints, and scratches show easily on clear glass cabinets.

On the other hand, clear glass cabinets offer a bit of flexibility. A clear panel can be etched to add a bit of personality to the display or to better frame what it holds.

While you might think of clear glass as the default option, keep in mind that the classics are classic for a reason!

2. Frosted Glass Cabinets

Frosted glass is another popular option for cabinet doors. Frosted glass is more opaque than standard transparent glass, having a foggy appearance that doesn't completely hide the objects behind it.

There are several methods of frosting glass, but they all result in the same signature smoky look.

The allure of frosted glass is the hint of mystery it adds. It's not the best choice for a display cabinet, but it can still be a great option to bring a touch of intrigue to an otherwise dull cabinet.

Frosted glass cabinets obscure objects, but don't hide them completely. You may still be able to see a silhouette. This gives you a little more leeway than clear glass in terms of what you keep in that particular cabinet.

Even if the objects on your shelf are random odds and ends, the smooth appearance of the glass (and the interesting shadows behind it) will look impressive in any room!

3. Reeded Glass Cabinets

Reeded glass is a kind of textured glass. Craftsmen make textured glass by pressing a roller into the glass during the glass-making process, giving it a unique look and feel.

In the case of reeded glass cabinets, the panel has vertical indentations across the surface of the glass, giving it an almost accordion-like appearance.

Reeded glass fits between clear glass and frosted glass in terms of transparency. There's no frosting or added opacity to the glass itself, but the reeded pattern does obscure objects a bit.

You'll still be able to see the shape and color of something behind reeded glass. It becomes harder to make out fine details, though. There's an almost blurry quality to items in reeded glass cabinets.

This is a great way to display items, because viewers can still see the item despite the texture. The glass simply adds an extra layer of personality... and covers up any minor imperfections you might want to obscure!

4. Seeded Glass Cabinets

Like reeded glass, seeded glass is a style of textured glass. As you can tell, textured glass is a flexible way of customizing your cabinetry! Instead of vertical lines, seeded glass cabinets feature bubbles of varying size.

Seeded glass is another style that sits somewhere in the middle of clear and frosted glass in opacity. Items in seeded glass cabinets will be visible, but obscured somewhat by the bubbles.

Unlike reeded glass, though, seeded glass is quite adaptable in this department.

The size of the bubbles makes all the difference in seeded glass. Large bubbles will do more to obscure objects from view, while smaller bubbles are easier to see through.

Glassmakers create the bubbles by injecting gases into the glass while it's still taking shape. As the gases escape, they create bubbles on the surface of the pane.

One of the most charming aspects of seeded glass is its almost water-like appearance. Seeded glass cabinets reflect and play with light in a way that few other options can match.

5. Leaded and Stained Glass Cabinets

Leaded glass and stained glass are two styles that are defined by lead caming. Caming is when multiple pieces of glass are held together by thin strips of lead, zinc, or copper.

These strips form a pattern, adding a beautiful touch to any cabinet.

The term leaded glass is a catch-all; it includes regular glass held together by cames as well as colored (or stained) glass held together in the same style.

The advantage of using stained glass is that the colors can be used to enhance patterns or depict a specific image. A stained glass cabinet door is sure to make an impression on any who see it!

That said, leaded glass doesn't need color to look stunning. Often, the intricate pattern made by the caming is stunning on its own.

Many cabinets mix clear glass with stained glass, forming an image while also allowing viewers to see the items inside the display case.

Picking the Perfect Glass Cabinet Doors

A glass cabinet is an excellent statement piece for any room of your home. Whether you're using clear glass cabinet doors to display a piece or textured glass for an eye-catching aesthetic, glass cabinets are sure to get attention.

Are you interested in a fashionable glass cabinet of your own? Contact us today with any questions you may have about our elegant cabinetry.

 


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published